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Pedi Notes

Dry Skin or Athlete's Foot? How to spot the difference.

Dry Skin or Athlete's Foot? How to spot the difference.

by Judy Baldinger

4 months ago


Pedi Notes

Dry Skin or Athlete's Foot? How to spot the difference.

by Judy Baldinger

4 months ago


Dry Skin or Athlete's Foot? How to spot the difference.

How do I know if the scaly, dry skin on my feet athlete’s foot or just dry skin?

You can feel very uncomfortable with these conditions experiencing painful fissures, unsightly flaking and uncomfortable itching.

Sometimes the symptoms are obvious and sometimes they are not. These two conditions can even happen at the same time.  Dry skin, especially dry skin that cracks can be a portal for a fungal infection.  Fungus can cause the skin to feel dry and flake.  You can have both conditions at the same time!

Here is the lowdown on symptoms:

Athlete’s foot symptoms:

  • Usually starts between the toes.
  • Has an angry red rash that spreads.
  • Is uncomfortably itchy.

Dry Skin symptoms:

  • Cracked heels.
  • Flakey or rough skin.
  • Itching.

Athlete’s foot and dry skin require different types of treatments and….  

If you have both dry skin and fungus you have to treat both.

Why is this happening?

One of the major culprits of this condition is excessive sweat.  Wetness causes both the skin to dry and is the ideal environment for fungus to thrive.

How can I find a solution?

Try self-care for three weeks. Our selection of premium quality foot care products works.  It’s sold to real patients. 

Dry Skin

Athletes Foot

  • Wash your feet every day.
  • Wear socks that wick away moisture.
  • Use an antifungal cream until two weeks after symptoms disappear.
  • Throw out old shoes.
  • Disinfect your shoes using a shoe spray or UV light.
  • Alternate shoes.
  • Keep your feet dry with an antiperspirant formulated for your feet.
  • Avoid walking barefoot in public areas.  Especially wet ones.

If symptoms persist and OTC products don’t work after three weeks see a podiatrist.  He may actually culture the skin to confirm an accurate diagnosis.  He also has stronger prescription only medications.

Pedicurian Keep You Moving.